Dating extremely shy

Mercury poisoning was common among hat makers in England in the 18th and 19th centuries, who used mercury to stabilize wool into felt fabric.

The prevalence of shyness in some children can be linked to day length during pregnancy, particularly during the midpoint of prenatal development.

People who are shy are generally considered high headed, but that is not the case most of the time.

It's just that they take their time opening up and feel vulnerable in exposing themselves to everyone.

Several genetic links to shyness are current areas of research.

One is the serotonin transporter promoter region polymorphism (5-HTTLPR), the long form of which has been shown to be modestly correlated with shyness in grade school children.

The primary defining characteristic of shyness is a largely ego-driven fear of what other people will think of a person's behavior.

This results in a person becoming scared of doing or saying what they want to out of fear of negative reactions, being laughed at, humiliated or patronised, criticism or rejection.

Teachers can model social skills and ask questions in a less direct and intimidating manner in order to gently encourage shy students to speak up in class, and make friends with other children. Scientists believe that they have located genetic data supporting the hypothesis that shyness is, at least, partially genetic.

However, there is also evidence that suggests the environment in which a person is raised can also be responsible for their shyness.

Mouse models have also been used, to derive genes suitable for further study in humans; one such gene, the glutamic acid decarboxylase gene (which encodes an enzyme that functions in GABA synthesis), has so far been shown to have some association with behavioral inhibition.

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