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A Singles’ Dating Convention member sent this to me: “I’ve recently joined a different singles’ site and am running into the same issue I’ve had with the previous ones I’ve been involved in.

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"' Let me go ahead and put in my credit card information.'"Russell paid $100 for 1,000 credits, which he could spend on sending replies or virtual gifts. After a few months of rejection, he didn't bother to log back on Ashley Madison again.

Last July, he found out that he wasn't the only one getting the silent treatment.

It’s a numbers game and they have tons of fake profiles all over the Internet to be worrying about.

Especially, if someone flags them and has their account deleted, they have to create a whole new account.

Unless the online dating industry makes a push toward cleaning up their websites, men and women will continue to fall prey to fake profiles.

You Get What You Pay For It seems the “free” membership sites tend to be the ones most likely to have more fake profiles on them.

It’s not as simple as some online dating services claim it is.

Singles, both men and women, are under attack from the fakes.

They need to make as many contacts as possible—remember it’s a numbers game. You are doing the best you can by being smart and wary of potential fakers. Will enough singles get fed up with the not-so-great state of online dating and demand better from the industry? As a contributor to online dating industry forums, I continue to bring up the issues associated with fake profiles: liars, thieves and cheats, and the accountability of the industry for a solution.

Even if you put on your profile in bold letters, “No Fakers or Sex Industry Professionals,” it won’t help. My suggestion for your first contact, if you’re worried they’re not telling the truth, is to ask them outright. The standard industry reply is that “it’s not cost effective” and that “singles won’t pay for it.” Well, singles are “paying for it” in time, frustration, dissatisfaction and with their wallets.

A hacker group called The Impact Team leaked internal memos from Ashley Madison's parent company, Avid Life, which revealed the widespread use of sexbots — artificially-intelligent programs, posing as real people, intended to seduce lonely hearts like Russell into paying for premium service. The strangers hitting you up for likes on Facebook? And, like many online trends, this one's rising up from the steamier corners of the web.

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