Wagner cast iron dating

In 1891 their cast iron foundry went into operation, and it continued producing cast-iron cookware for over a century before closing in 1999.Wagner was acquired by the Randall Corporation in 1952, five years before the same company also purchased Griswold.It was among the first manufacturing companies in America to integrate computer technology.

From the early 1900s through the 1970s, Birmingham Stove & Range foundry produced a line of cast-iron pans that are described as "unmarked:" they had no manufacturer logo or other identifying mark.

These "unmarked" cast-iron skillets and pans from Birmingham Stove & Range are widely available and used on a daily basis, even in the present day.

After Wagner and Griswold were brought under the Randall Company, the Erie cast iron foundry was closed, and all cast-iron items produced by the company were manufactured in Wagner's Ohio location.

Wagner Ware cooking items continued to be produced through the 1960s through the 1990s.

They are also highly sought after by antique collectors and dealers.

Among the rarest products were those produced in 1920. The Atlanta 32 box became one of the rarest items in 1920 production.

In the early 1900s this was changed to a "GRISWOLD" logo, and it is this logo that is most commonly associated with Griswold cast-iron cookware.

Griswold filed for bankruptcy in 1957, and the company was acquired by Randall Corporation, who had also acquired Griswold's rival Wagner Ware in 1952.

Most American households had at least one cast-iron stove and cooking pan, and such brands as Griswold and Wagner Ware were especially popular; though several other manufacturers also produced kitchen utensils and cooking pots and pans at that time.

Tags: , ,